Pharmacy Services

Vaccination Services

Wizard Pharmacy is proud to be part of the initiative to increase vaccination rates amongst Australians by offering our local communities immunisations against certain illnesses such as influenza, whooping cough, measles and meningococcal disease.

Which vaccinations can Pharmacist administer?

The vaccines that Pharmacists are able to administer are:

  • Influenza (Flu)

  • COVID-19 

  • Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR)

  • Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (whooping cough)

  • Meningococcal ACWY

Who is most likely to benefit from these vaccinations?

  • Any adult with a gap in their vaccine schedule

  • Adult relatives, such as grandparents, who will be coming into contact with babies and need a booster shot for whooping cough

  • People wanting the meningococcal ACWY vaccine but are not eligible for the State-funded program

Where can I be vaccinated?

Bookings and walk-ins are welcome. It is advised to call to ensure your local pharmacy has the required vaccine and the Pharmacist who can vaccinate is available.

How much will it cost?

The cost of vaccination services will vary depending on the type of vaccine, please contact you local Wizard Pharmacy to check.

Can I do it?

Our trained Pharmacists are available to administer the vaccinations to people over the age of 16.

Do I need a prescription to get the vaccines?

No, a prescription is not required if the Pharmacist is administering the vaccine at the pharmacy.

Do I need to let my GP know?

All vaccinations administered at Wizard Pharmacy are reported to the Australian Immunisation Register (AIR). The AIR is a national register that records vaccines given to all people of all ages and information in the Register is accessible by authorised health professionals such as GPs, Nurse Immunisers and Pharmacists, as well as by individuals for their own records and those of their children.

Facts about Influenza (Flu)

Click HERE to read all about Influenza (Flu). 

Facts about COVID-19

Click HERE to read all about COVID-19. 

Click HERE to learn about available COVID-19 Vaccinations.

Facts about Whooping Cough

What is Whooping Cough?

Whooping cough is a bacterial infection caused by Bordetella pertussis. It is an airborne respiratory infection with symptoms similar to the common cold. It can affect people of all ages, but is particularly serious in young children and babies, often life-threatening in babies less than 6 months of age. It is highly contagious and is spread by coughing and sneezing. The disease is named ‘Whooping Cough’ because the cold-like symptoms are followed by a long period of coughing fits, which cause the infected person to make a high-pitched ‘whoop’ when inhaling after coughing.

What are the symptoms of Whooping Cough?

Whooping cough symptoms usually start about 7 to 10 days after catching Whooping Cough and may include:

  • blocked or runny nose

  • sneezing

  • raised temperature

  • uncontrolled bouts of coughing that sounds like a ‘whoop’ or are followed by a ‘whooping’ noise

  • vomiting after coughing

What is the Whooping Cough Vaccine?

The Whooping cough vaccine is only available in combination with diphtheria and tetanus.  

Who should receive the Whooping Cough vaccine?

The dTpa (diphtheria, tetanus and whooping cough) vaccine is recommended for anyone who wishes to protect themselves against these diseases. By getting vaccinated, you can also protect other people, especially those who are too young to be vaccinated and help prevent the disease from spreading.

It is important for healthcare workers and anyone who will be having contact with newborn babies to ensure that they receive the booster vaccine against whooping cough. This includes partners of pregnant women, grandparents, extended family and friends.
Women should have a whooping cough vaccine during each pregnancy, the vaccine is free for pregnant women from their GP. A Booster dose is recommended  for adults every 10 years.

What else do I need to know?

All medicines including vaccines, can have side effects, however, most of these side effects are minor. Common side effects following the Whooping Cough vaccine include soreness, redness, pain, fever and swelling at the injection site. These side effects are usually mild and resolve without any treatment within a few days. If you are concerned you should contact your local GP or Wizard Pharmacist.

Source: Australian Government, Department of Health https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/immunisation/immunisation-services/whooping-cough-pertussis-immunisation-service-0

Facts about Measles, Mumps and Rubella

What is Measles, Mumps and Rubella?

Measles, Mumps and Rubella are all highly contagious viral infections that can cause serious complications. They are all spread by respiratory droplets when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

Measles causes a rash and fever. Complications include pneumonia, middle ear infections and swelling of the brain (encephalitis).

Mumps causes fever and swollen salivary glands. Complications include inflammation of the brain (encephalitis), lining of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) or of the heart (myocarditis).

Rubella (German Measles) causes a skin rash and joint pain. It is usually a mild illness but for pregnant women the disease can cause life-long problems for their babies.

Immunisation is the best protection against Measles, Mumps and Rubella and is highly recommended for all adults that haven’t already had two boosters, particularly those in high-risk groups like healthcare workers, parents or childcare workers, as well as those set to travel overseas.

What are the symptoms of Measles, Mumps and Rubella?

Measles symptoms usually start about 10 to 12 days after catching the virus and may include:

  • fever

  • generally feeling unwell

  • tiredness

  • runny nose

  • dry cough

  • sore, red eyes (conjunctivitis)

  • red rash (usually not itchy and disappears after about 1 week)

Mumps symptoms usually start about 12 to 25 days after catching the virus and may include:

  • fever

  • swelling of the face

  • headache

  • fatigue

  • aches and pains

  • loss of appetite

  • painful chewing or swallowing.

Rubella symptoms usually start about 14 to 21 days after catching the virus and may include:

  • rash

  • swollen lymph glands

  • joint pain

  • mild fever

  • headache

  • runny nose

  • sore red eyes.

What is the Measles, Mumps and Rubella Vaccine?

The Measles, Mumps and Rubella (MMR) vaccine offers protection against all 3 diseases in a single injection.

Who should receive the Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine?

Anyone born after 1965 that does not have documentation of two doses of the measles vaccine is recommended to receive this vaccine. It is particularly recommended for young adult travellers who may be visiting countries where measles continues to circulate, such as Asia and Europe or for women at least 4 weeks before becoming pregnant.

Who should NOT receive the Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine?

Unfortunately, the vaccine is not suitable for women who are pregnant or planning to fall pregnant soon. If you fall into this category, please speak to your GP for more advice.

What else do I need to know?

All medicines including vaccines, can have side effects, however, most of these side effects are minor. Common side effects following the Measles, Mumps and Rubella vaccine include soreness, redness, pain, fever and swelling at the injection site. These side effects are usually mild and resolve without any treatment within a few days. If you are concerned you should contact your local GP or Wizard Pharmacist.

Source: Western Australia Government, Department of Health https://www.healthywa.wa.gov.au/en/Articles/J_M/Measles-mumps-rubella-MMR-vaccine
 

Facts about Meningococcal 

What is Meningococcal?

Meningococcal disease is caused by strains of the bacterium called Neisseria meningitidis. It is transmitted through close contact with mucus from an infected person. The disease is rare but can be serious and life-threatening. Symptoms appear suddenly and people can die very quickly without medical help. There are subtypes of Meninococcal and they are given different letters of the alphabet. The main types seen in Australia are Meningococcus B, W and Y.

What are the symptoms of Meningococcal?

If you have any of the symptoms listed below and/or suspect you have meningococcal please seek immediate medical attention:

  • rash of red or purple pinprick spots, or larger bruise-like areas

  • fever

  • headache

  • neck stiffness

  • discomfort when you look at bright light

  • nausea or vomiting

  • diarrhoea

  • feeling very, very sick

Other possible symptoms include:

  • loss of appetite or refusing to feed (in young children)

  • irritability or fretfulness

  • confusion

  • drowsiness

  • extreme tiredness or floppiness (in young children)

  • aching or sore muscles

  • painful or swollen joints

  • difficulty walking, and maybe collapsing

  • grunting or moaning

  • difficulty talking

  • having fits or twitching (in young children)

What is the Meningococcal Vaccine?

Several vaccines are available in Australia, however, no single vaccine protects against all strains of meningococcal bacteria.

Your Doctor or Wizard Pharmacist can advise you about which vaccines are available and appropriate for you.

Who should receive the Meningococcal vaccine?

Anyone who wants to protect themselves against meningococcal disease can talk to their Doctor or Pharmacist about getting immunised. Meningococcal vaccination is recommended for:  

  • healthy adolescents aged 16-19 years

  • adolescents and young adults living together in close quarters, such as dormitories

  • adolescents and young adults who are current smokers 

  • people who are travelling overseas, especially to places where meningococcal disease is more common

  • people who have medical conditions that increase their risk of invasive meningococcal disease for example, people who have certain blood disorders

  • people with weakened immune systems, such as people without a functioning spleen, people living with HIV and people who have had a stem cell transplant

  • laboratory workers who work with the bacterium that causes meningococcal disease

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Some people may be eligible to receive some of the vaccines under the National Immunisation Program ask your local Wizard Pharmacy for more information.

What else do I need to know?

All medicines including vaccines, can have side effects, however, most of these side effects are minor. Common side effects following the Meningococcal vaccine include soreness, redness, pain, fever and swelling at the injection site. These side effects are usually mild and resolve without any treatment within a few days. If you are concerned you should contact your local GP or Wizard Pharmacist.

Source: Australiad Government, Department of Health https://www.health.gov.au/health-topics/immunisation/immunisation-services/meningococcal-immunisation-service-0

Scroll to top